Arezu

Bio

B.1983 Tehran, lives in Dubai

Catalog of Available Works »

Education

2004-9 American University in Dubai – BFA in Visual Communication, Concentration in Photography
2002-3 Azad University of Art and Architecture- Theatre and stage design
2001-6 Private student of Taha Behbahani, the great painting surrealist master in Iran

Select Solo Exhibitions

2011 Trespassing, XVA Gallery, Dubai
2010 That Obscure Object, project space at The Third Line Gallery, Dubai

Select Group Exhibitions

2011 Contemporary Istanbul, XVA Gallery, Istanbul, Turkey
2011 Young Collectors Auction, Ayyam Gallery, Dubai, UAE
2011 Houston Center for Photography Auction Exhibition, Houston, TX USA
2010 L’art selon elles, France
2010 Black and white photography festival Porto, Portugal
2009 Nu’es, baudoin Lebon Gallery Paris, France
2009 Young collector’s art fair and auction, Ayyam gallery Dubai
2009 Basically Human, a curated exhibition of AUD New York, USA
2008 Rituals of Dinner, senior student show by AUD, Ayyam Gallery Dubai, UAE
2008 New Signature, DIFC Dubai, UAE
2007 Student Summer Show, Meem Gallery Dubai, UAE
2007 Basically Human Dubai, UAE
2007 Installation art at Bastakia during art Dubai Dubai, UAE
2006 New Signature, DIFC Dubai, UAE
2005 Sheep are Welcome Dubai, UAE

Projects

2010 Catholic University in Portugal – Lecture – black and white photography festival
2009 Jasad Magazine- Lebanon – Cover artist

Artist Statement - That Obscure Object

My work is rooted in concepts of obscurity and ambiguity.

Working on this series I felt a wonderful sense of release and space of my own. It felt as though I was allowed to be in that space, just to be and be allowed. That’s when I started looking at crows. The freedom they have while flying fascinates me, maybe because that is something that I don’t have. I started thinking: what does space mean to a crow? And what does space mean to me?

The portraits represent a desire to be, but not seeking to be seen or to be paid attention to. I drew inspiration from 19th century representations of the female form. These women were devoid of identity, portrayed as objects of desire. By contrast, in my work, the self becomes both subject and object. The crow becomes a metaphor for freedom and anonymity. They are one, or better to say one is the desire of the other.